Detox Local

For the most immediate assistance

CALL

OR submit you number and someone will call you shortly!

If you are seeking drug and alcohol related addiction rehab for yourself or a loved one, the DetoxLocal.com hotline is a confidential and convenient solution. The calls are answered by Addiction Advisor's Treatment network and/or Elevations Health.

All submissions we receive will be followed up diligently and validated by a Detox Local staff member

Overview of Hydrocodone detox

Whether used for legitimate medical purposes, preventative maintenance, or for recreation, we human beings are no strangers to substance use. Our history with alcohol goes back thousands of years, including periods when people drank more alcohol and anything else. We have a lengthy history with other substances used as well, including tobacco, hemp, and opium. In more modern times, our experimentation with these and other substances has resulted in the creation of many synthetic and semi-synthetic drugs. Most of the time, these substances were created for genuine purposes such as for physicians to use before surgery or for doctors to prescribe to those who are ill. There are many other uses for the substances we have created, but the majority were created to help people. Unfortunately, that’s not always how they’re used.

The substances comprising the class of prescription medications that are called painkillers can be traced back to the early-twentieth century. This was the period when many of the opioid painkillers that are so common today were first created. However, it wasn’t until the 1990s that these drugs started to be so commonplace. In particular, it was OxyContin that triggered a major boom in prescription drug abuse. With most doctors prescribing OxyContin and other opioid substances extremely liberally, there were way more people gaining access to these drugs than there needed to be. As a result, many of them were diverted, which refers to the selling of prescription drugs to substance abusers on the streets.

One of those drugs is called hydrocodone. Not to be confused with oxycodone, hydrocodone is slightly less popular—although it’s still very, very popular among drug abusers—than drugs like OxyContin, but remains a major problem in the U.S. According to a United Nations publication, more than 99 percent of the global hydrocodone supply is consumed in the U.S., showing just how much of a problem hydrocodone is today. On the brightside, those who are becoming or have become addicted to hydrocodone have a number of recovery options available, beginning with hydrocodone detox treatment.

Click below for detailed Opiate detox guides

How Detoxing From Hydrocodone works

Like any painkiller, hydrocodone is a highly addictive drug that’s derived from the opium obtained from the opium poppy. Actually, hydrocodone is a semi-synthetic product of codeine, which is a derivative of opium itself. As far as its intended purpose, hydrocodone was designed to be a strong painkiller that could treat moderate to severe pain, but it can also serve as an antitussive, or a cough suppressant. In comparisons between hydrocodone and oxycodone, it’s been found that it takes one-and-a-half times the amount of oxycodone for hydrocodone to have the same or similar effects; therefore, it’s significantly less potent than oxycodone, making hydrocodone preferable to most physicians who are conscious of the addictive potential of this and other opioid drugs.

Whereas OxyContin and certain other forms of oxycodone don’t typically contain any other ingredients besides oxycodone, which is partly what makes them so powerful. However, most forms of hydrocodone have combined the drug with acetaminophen, which is better known as Tylenol and likely the reason why hydrocodone isn’t more effective. The most well-known forms of hydrocodone include Vicodin, Norco, and Lortab; however, a concentrated form of the drug was recently approved and is called Zohydro.

When a person takes a large amount of hydrocodone, the drug has a major effect of his or her brain. With the continued abuse of hydrocodone over time, the body becomes dependent on those changes, even for natural functioning. This is also what causes withdrawal symptoms when a person goes without hydrocodone, seemingly discouraging individuals from overcoming hydrocodone addiction. However, hydrocodone detox offers such people a means of taking back their independence and lives.

WHAT DOES THE Hydrocodone DETOX PROCESS LOOK LIKE?

People who have become dependent on drugs like hydrocodone have difficulty bringing themselves to the point of wanting to overcome their addictions. This resistance is largely due to the experience of withdrawal symptoms during instances when they’re unable to obtain their substances of choice. During these times, the withdrawals they experience are at maximum intensity as they aren’t receiving any treatment for them. The experience of these intense withdrawals causes them to fear the recovery process, which they see as being tantamount to inviting the withdrawal symptoms. However, what they don’t realize is that they only experienced such intense withdrawals because they weren’t receiving any treatments like they would at a hydrocodone detox treatment program.

The purpose of a hydrocodone detox is to break a person’s dependence on hydrocodone and to cleanse the body of any and all toxins. Since a person addicted to hydrocodone would typically experience intense withdrawal without hydrocodone, a hydrocodone detox program must help make detoxification and the bodily cleansing to be a pain-free and comfortable as possible, which hydrocodone detox programs do by offering a number of different accommodations and treatments. For instance, most detox facilities offer patients their own bedrooms while also providing a balanced, nutritious diet and plenty of hydration. Over the course of the detox period, a person’s physical state continually improves, preparing him or her for subsequent phases of treatment.

As a semi-synthetic opioid and central nervous system depressant, hydrocodone has very particular effects on the brain. When a person takes an excessive dose of hydrocodone, the opioid causes a surge of neurochemicals such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine; each of these neurochemicals are major players in the brain’s reward and pleasure pathways as well as having some effect on memory, learning, and mood. Moreover, hydrocodone bonds readily with the brain’s opiate receptors, deterring any feelings of pain and essentially dampening the responsiveness of the central nervous system.

With the continued abuse of hydrocodone over time, a person becomes addicted to the drug and must continue his or her hydrocodone intake to maintain the brain’s neurochemistry. Without hydrocodone, however, he or she will begin to experience withdrawal symptoms. Hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms are very similar to withdrawal symptoms for any type of opioid, or opium-like, drug. For instance, people in withdrawal from hydrocodone experience severe insomnia, intermittent hot flashes and cold chills, sweating, and oftentimes physical pain in the muscles and joints. Additionally, hydrocodone withdrawals are known to include an overall lack of energy and motivation, but while also making individuals feel extremely restless and anxious. As one would expect, there are intense cravings for hydrocodone and virtually any other opioid that could offer similar effects.

Hydrocodone Detox Withdrawals

Pill Bottle Icon
Pill Icon
Syringe Icon

As a semi-synthetic opioid and central nervous system depressant, hydrocodone has very particular effects on the brain. When a person takes an excessive dose of hydrocodone, the opioid causes a surge of neurochemicals such as dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine; each of these neurochemicals are major players in the brain’s reward and pleasure pathways as well as having some effect on memory, learning, and mood. Moreover, hydrocodone bonds readily with the brain’s opiate receptors, deterring any feelings of pain and essentially dampening the responsiveness of the central nervous system.

With the continued abuse of hydrocodone over time, a person becomes addicted to the drug and must continue his or her hydrocodone intake to maintain the brain’s neurochemistry. Without hydrocodone, however, he or she will begin to experience withdrawal symptoms. Hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms are very similar to withdrawal symptoms for any type of opioid, or opium-like, drug. For instance, people in withdrawal from hydrocodone experience severe insomnia, intermittent hot flashes and cold chills, sweating, and oftentimes physical pain in the muscles and joints. Additionally, hydrocodone withdrawals are known to include an overall lack of energy and motivation, but while also making individuals feel extremely restless and anxious. As one would expect, there are intense cravings for hydrocodone and virtually any other opioid that could offer similar effects.

List of Hydrocodone Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Irritability
  • Lack of energy
  • Sweating
  • Hot flashes and cold chills
  • Depression
  • Yawning
  • Watery eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Nausea
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Diarrhea or vomiting
  • Physical pain in joints and/or muscles
  • Sneezing
  • Intense insomnia

Can you detox from Hydrocodone at home?

As mentioned previously, one of the main reasons why addicts are resistant to or outright reject the addiction recovery process is because of their fear of withdrawal. Most people who are in need of treatment assume that they must suffer through withdrawals in order to break their physical dependence and get to the point of the actual treatment phase of recovery. Hydrocodone detox treatment offers a more comfortable, pain-free way of overcoming physical hydrocodone dependence completely free from any suffering. And not only is detox treatment beneficial in terms of comfort, but it’s also much safer to detox in an actual detox program.

While hydrocodone might not be one of the most dangerous addictions, it’s never safe to go through a detoxification or cleanse without professional, medical supervision. At home, detoxification treatment is intense and, in cases of severe addiction, can result in potentially life-threatening symptoms. However, at an actual detox facilities patients are under round-the-clock supervision and receiving care from a team of experienced medical professionals who can ensure a safe, successful hydrocodone detox.

Need help finding a detox center

How long does it take to detox from Hydrocodone

Everyone who develops an addiction—to hydrocodone or any other drug—becomes addicted for different reasons and under different circumstances. Additionally, every alcoholic and drug addict is affected by the disease of addiction in a different way; therefore, one would reasonably expect for every addict’s detox and recovery needs to differ significantly. For those whose addictions are less severe than most, detoxification from hydrocodone wouldn’t take as long as would normally be expected. Meanwhile, those who are experiencing severe hydrocodone addiction may need a little extra time to successfully complete detoxification treatment. Generally, the peak of hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms occurs about 72 hours after the individual’s last dose with the physical withdrawal symptoms lasting between 7 to 10 days, on average, until they’re resolved.

  • Today, hydrocodone is the number one most-prescribed opioid painkiller in the U.S.
  • Hydrocodone was first engineered in Germany in the 1920s by adding oxygen molecules to the codeine obtained from the opium poppy.
  • According to researchers, hydrocodone is most effective when used for one of the following purposes: (1) managing pain, (2) suppressive cough, and/or (3) producing feelings of euphoria.
  • Hydrocodone wasn’t officially confirmed to be addicted by research evidence until 1961 when it had already been in widespread use for 30 years.
  • According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, there were more than 136 million hydrocodone prescriptions written/filled in 2013.