Detox Local

For the most immediate assistance

CALL

OR submit you number and someone will call you shortly!

If you are seeking drug and alcohol related addiction rehab for yourself or a loved one, the DetoxLocal.com hotline is a confidential and convenient solution. The calls are answered by Addiction Advisor's Treatment, American Addiction Centers, Rise Behavioral Health and/or Elevations Health.

All submissions we receive will be followed up diligently and validated by a Detox Local staff member

Overview of Opium detox

Though not as popular as it once was, since the rise of online drug trafficking, the use of opium, or poppies, has risen in the past 10 years. Typically, opium is used to create more powerful drugs like morphine, heroin and prescription painkillers. Once, opium was an extremely popular drug and a focus of trade in Asia. Since the discovery of morphine and heroin, these drugs have taken opium’s place and become some of the most addictive and abused substances in the world. Even though opium is far less potent than heroin or morphine, it is still very addictive. Opium causes physical and psychological addiction that can be hard to break. Over time, the body becomes dependent on the drug and severe withdrawal symptoms are experienced when administration ceases. The best way to combat addiction is a specialized opium detox program.

Opium ranks on par with alcohol as one of the world’s most ancient drugs. Its use dates back thousands of years. It has been used all over the world as a medicine, a spiritual remedy and as a recreational drug. It is mentioned in ancient papyrus texts and describing as being used in surgeries. It is the oldest pain reliever on the planet and is still used today to synthesize pain relievers. It was used in Roman, Greek, Indian and Egyptian Empires, and its use continued all the way through the American Civil War until morphine was first synthesized. Morphine is made directly from opium, but allows for injection and much more accurate dosages.

Widespread addiction epidemics were not common until the 15th century in China. This is when it was first mixed with tobacco and smoked. Previously, the most common use of opium was by mouth, and its effects were fairly minimal aside from immediate pain relief. When opium is smoked, it causes a much more intense high and is extremely addictive. It became an epidemic in China and was banned in the 18th century, yet the trend continued. This caused widespread, deadly addiction and rampant overdose. When smoked, opium is hard to dose and the high is not as long-lasting, so one may find himself continuously smoking opium to achieve the same high. Tolerance rises quickly and thus dependence occurs, making opium extremely difficult to quit.

Today, the most common opiates are morphine and heroin, but opium is still used. Opium is most prevalent in Afghanistan, India and other parts of the Middle East. The poppies are cultivated and smuggled into Europe or other parts of the world. Opium use has seen a rise since the recent trend of buying and selling drugs over the internet. Some have begun to buy raw poppies online to mix in tea which they consider less dangerous than other opioids, but this still can be very addictive. Smokable opium is also sold on the internet. This is common among youth because they are the most proficient on the internet. Special programs are needed to access the “dark web” and purchase illicit substances.

Click below for detailed Opiate detox guides

How Detoxing From Opium works

Because opium is physically addicting, the most effect treatment for addiction is inpatient medical detox. Not only can it be hard to stay sober due to cravings; additionally, opium withdrawal can be extremely painful. In medical detox, medication can be used to reduce symptoms and make detox a much more tolerable process. In medical detox a patient will be evaluated by a doctor and an effective treatment plan will be made. Typically Suboxone or another form of buprenorphine is used to taper off the drug slowly. Buprenorphine can significantly reduce symptoms to an almost non-existent level.

In addition to buprenorphine, other comfort medications are used. Drugs like benzodiazepines and other non-narcotic medications are used to help with anxiety, restlessness and trouble sleeping. There are also medications that can assist with depression, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. The patient will also be assigned a therapist with whom they can talk during this critical time. Often when a person quits opiates they feel strong emotions because they have been numbed for so long.

The goal of detox is to get opium out of the body effectively and as painlessly as possible. It can take days or up to a week for symptoms to dissipate, but throughout this time doctors and other medically trained staff will be monitoring to ensure a safe and comfortable detox. In detox, one can also learn healthy coping skills to assist with long term recovery.

WHAT DOES THE Opium DETOX PROCESS LOOK LIKE?

The opium detox process looks like any other opioid detox. It is physically addicting, and therefore it will be painful without assistance. The first few days are characterized by intense physical illness with vomiting, diarrhea and stomach pain. This is in addition to intense cravings and psychological symptoms like depression and anxiety. Restless arms and legs is also very common.
The process consists of an evaluation, a taper and constant monitoring to ensure safety.

Buprenorphine is used in decreasing increments to reduce symptoms. Benzodiazepines or barbiturates are used in the first couple of days to assist with sleep and severe anxiety. Buprenorphine is tapered down to nothing, and then other non-narcotic comfort medications are used to assist after that. Clonidine, a blood pressure medication, is a safe drug that assists with anxiety and restlessness. Antidepressants can also be prescribed if there is severe depression.

Therapists in detox can help the patient learn healthy coping skills to use after detox. They can also look for underlying mental health problems like generalized anxiety disorder or chronic depression. Sometimes drugs can be prescribed to be used after detox to assist in a happy long term recovery.

Withdrawals are the symptoms felt when one quits using an abused substance. Opium has both physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms. Physical symptoms include vomiting, cramps, muscle aches and diarrhea. Psychological symptoms include anxiety, depression, insomnia and confusion. Medication can be used for both types of symptoms, but if not in detox, withdrawals will be felt in full.

Depending on route of ingestion, tolerance can rise quickly. The higher a person’s tolerance, the more their body is going to be dependent on drug. This means more physical symptoms will be felt. Almost any drug can be psychologically addicting, but opioids can be especially difficult to quit because of their physical symptoms. In detox there's medication for almost every physical symptom, and the process will be fairly comfortable. Many avoid detox because they think it will be extremely painful. This is because typically when they try on their own they feel the full effects of withdrawal, which can be very frightening. They have tried to quit on their own, or have not been able to obtain opiates, and may think detox will feel the same.

Opium Detox Withdrawals

Pill Bottle Icon Used for thousands of years in China and the Middle East
Pill Icon Withdrawal can be very painful
Syringe Icon Opium trade gained popularity in 17th century

Withdrawals are the symptoms felt when one quits using an abused substance. Opium has both physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms. Physical symptoms include vomiting, cramps, muscle aches and diarrhea. Psychological symptoms include anxiety, depression, insomnia and confusion. Medication can be used for both types of symptoms, but if not in detox, withdrawals will be felt in full.

Depending on route of ingestion, tolerance can rise quickly. The higher a person’s tolerance, the more their body is going to be dependent on drug. This means more physical symptoms will be felt. Almost any drug can be psychologically addicting, but opioids can be especially difficult to quit because of their physical symptoms. In detox there's medication for almost every physical symptom, and the process will be fairly comfortable. Many avoid detox because they think it will be extremely painful. This is because typically when they try on their own they feel the full effects of withdrawal, which can be very frightening. They have tried to quit on their own, or have not been able to obtain opiates, and may think detox will feel the same.

List of Opium Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Cramps
  • Diarrhea/vomiting
  • Mood swings
  • Agitation
  • Confusion
  • Tremors
  • Restlessness
  • Restless legs
  • Insomnia
  • Muscle aches
  • Runny nose
  • Cold sweats

Can you detox from Opium at home?

Opium detox itself is not considered dangerous, so it may be possible to detox from home, though this is not recommended. Opium detox can be very painful without medical help, which is unnecessary. In detox comfort medications can be prescribed and there is also the reassurance from medical professionals that the patient will be alright.

Opium withdrawal can be very depressing, and a person may lose motivation or hope of having a normal life. Because any opiate detox is so painful, one may become desperate and do anything to feel better. They may commit crime and put themselves or loved ones at risk. Sometimes individuals feel suicidal while in withdrawal and, if not in a medical detox, can make rash decisions. Talk therapy can be highly beneficial in detox and can motivate the person to stay on the path to recovery.

With any addiction, underlying mental health conditions are very common, with generalized anxiety, chronic depression and bipolar disorder being the most common. Without medical help, one cannot be diagnosed or treated for these disorders. Trying to stay sober with mental health conditions can be extremely difficult and lead to relapse. Roughly 50% of drug addicts have some form of underlying mental health conditions. It is highly recommended to seek medical help from a doctor and or licensed therapist if attempting to quit opium.

Need help finding a detox center

How long does it take to detox from Opium

Opium detox length has many factors but mostly depends on length and quantity of use. Other factors are metabolism, age, height and weight. The length of inpatient medical detox is typically 3-10 days. Symptoms peak at about 3 days after use and usually dissipate after 5 days. WIth heavy use this can take more than a week. Though the drug will be out of the body in just days, symptoms can be felt much longer. After physical symptoms dissipate, psychological symptoms can persist much longer.

Medications may be prescribed for after the detox process. These are usually non-addictive medications to assist with anxiety, depression and sleep. Post acute withdrawal syndrome, or PAWS, occurs in some individuals. This is characterized by symptoms that are felt weeks, months or even years after opium use. PAWS is usually psychological in nature and consists of trouble concentrating, insomnia, anxiety and depression. In detox, one can learn skills to cope with PAWS like meditation, gratitude lists, forming support networks and engaging in talk therapy.

  • Earliest known use is 5000 BCE, but could be even older
  • Afghanistan is the largest producer of opium
  • Opium addiction was first formally recognized in the 17th century
  • Opium comes from poppies, a beautiful flowering plant