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Overview of Xanax detox

It’s only somewhat recently that we began to see addiction as a disease. Before that, people with substance abuse problems were seen as being weak in character and morals. As a result, they were largely punished for their sickness, confined in asylums or incarcerated in prisons. The idea was that being locked away would force them into sobriety while the threat of further incarceration would deter them from any further substance abuse. But that’s not how it turned out.

Most of the people would quickly return to their prior substance abuse upon their releases from internment, which indicated that there was something more to this behavior than it appeared. It wouldn’t be long before substance abuse would be compared to the obsessive compulsions exhibited by the mentally ill, leading to the first inklings that addiction was actually a disease of the brain.

With this knowledge, we’ve been able to create a variety of addiction treatments and programs to address the many effects of addiction that people experience after becoming chemically dependent. However, there is such a wide variety of mind-altering substances available today—most of which continue to be extremely accessible and, therefore, enticing—that contribute to the epidemic-like rates of addiction we are experiencing on both nationally and global scales. Many people attribute the currently epidemic—in which heroin is at the center—to the widespread abuse of OxyContin after its release by Purdue Pharma in the 1990s. Soon thereafter, people of all ages and demographics were abusing just about any prescription drugs they could find, including one that rivals alcohol in terms of how dangerous it is.

Click below for detailed Prescription Drug detox guides

How Detoxing From Xanax works

After opioid painkillers, benzodiazepines are one of the most-abused prescription drugs that are currently on the market, and they’re a class of pharmaceutical that’s universally agreed to be substantially more dangerous than just about any of the opioid drugs. In fact, benzodiazepines are more often compared to alcohol in terms of how dangerous it is to be dependent on them. Fortunately, there are resources available to help people addicted to this type of drug detox and get sober, but it’s important to know what benzodiazepines like Xanax actually are and how they work before one can understand the importance of Xanax detox treatment.

By definition, benzodiazepines— the class of pharmaceutical drugs to which Xanax belongs—are psychoactive, controlled medications that enhance the effects of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid, or GABA; this creates a hypnotic or sedative effect, which is why benzodiazepines, or “benzos”, are used as anxiolytics, or anti-anxiety drugs, as well as anticonvulsants for people with epileptic disorders and occasionally even as a muscle relaxant. Xanax is the most well-known benzodiazepine and is one of the most widely used due to it being somewhat more potent yet shorter-acting than most other benzodiazepines. And while Xanax has been commonly used to treat such conditions as panic disorder, anxiety-related disorders, and social phobias, most physicians are hesitant to prescribe Xanax for more than a few weeks at a time due to the high risk of dependence.

WHAT DOES THE Xanax DETOX PROCESS LOOK LIKE?

Addiction to and dependence on Xanax occurs when a person continues to take the drug daily for a period of time longer than the advised two to three weeks. The drug enhances the GABA neurotransmitter to induce feelings of calm and drowsiness, but when Xanax is taken regularly over a prolonged period of time the body becomes dependent on the Xanax as essentially the sole means of activating the GABA neurotransmitter. In other words, without the Xanax an individual’s brain experiences a major deficiency in GABA, causing a number of adverse symptoms and withdrawals. These symptoms are both physical and psychological, which is why many people who have become dependent on Xanax avoid the detox and recovery processes, fearful of having to confront withdrawal symptoms to complete a Xanax detox.

That’s where Xanax detox treatment comes in. For anyone who has become addicted to Xanax or another benzodiazepine, the detoxification process is available to restore him or her to a state of physical health. In particular, Xanax detoxification treatment is intended to cleanse a person’s body, ridding it of Xanax, any other chemical substances that might be present, and any toxins that might harm the body. The purpose of this comprehensive body cleanse is so that a person can proceed to subsequent phases of the recovery process, especially when he or she begins receiving counseling and participating in group therapy sessions.

As mentioned above, addiction to Xanax is one of the most dangerous addictions there are, often compared to alcohol in terms of severity. People who become addicted to Xanax will inevitably experience withdrawals from time to time, particularly when they are unable to obtain the drug to which they are addicted. Although these instances are only temporary until they get more benzodiazepines, the experience of Xanax and benzodiazepine withdrawals discourages Xanax addicts from pursuing Xanax detoxification treatment.

The withdrawal symptoms that are experienced as part of Xanax addiction are both physical and psychological. In terms of the physical symptoms, Xanax addicts often experience muscle tension and a sort of paresthesias, which refers to numbness or tingling in the extremities such as the hands and feet. One of the more familiar withdrawal symptoms that Xanax addicts experience is the digestive upset, which can entail severe nausea, diarrhea, and/or vomiting. There may also be tremors or jitters occurring throughout the body and many Xanax addicts experiencing withdrawal are known to exhibit a condition known as restless leg syndrome, which means that they continue to bounce their legs up and down with their feet on the floor, unable to stop for very long before they start again.

In terms of the psychological symptoms, one of the most well-known is the tendency for withdrawing Xanax addicts to experience severe anxiety, which is due to the deficiency of GABA in their brains. Additionally, Xanax addicts experience severe anxiety due to the same GABA deficiency. Like all other forms of addiction, Xanax addicts will experience a level of depression as well. At peak severity, Xanax withdrawal can result in seizures or death as is the case with alcohol withdrawal.

Xanax Detox Withdrawals

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As mentioned above, addiction to Xanax is one of the most dangerous addictions there are, often compared to alcohol in terms of severity. People who become addicted to Xanax will inevitably experience withdrawals from time to time, particularly when they are unable to obtain the drug to which they are addicted. Although these instances are only temporary until they get more benzodiazepines, the experience of Xanax and benzodiazepine withdrawals discourages Xanax addicts from pursuing Xanax detoxification treatment.

The withdrawal symptoms that are experienced as part of Xanax addiction are both physical and psychological. In terms of the physical symptoms, Xanax addicts often experience muscle tension and a sort of paresthesias, which refers to numbness or tingling in the extremities such as the hands and feet. One of the more familiar withdrawal symptoms that Xanax addicts experience is the digestive upset, which can entail severe nausea, diarrhea, and/or vomiting. There may also be tremors or jitters occurring throughout the body and many Xanax addicts experiencing withdrawal are known to exhibit a condition known as restless leg syndrome, which means that they continue to bounce their legs up and down with their feet on the floor, unable to stop for very long before they start again.

In terms of the psychological symptoms, one of the most well-known is the tendency for withdrawing Xanax addicts to experience severe anxiety, which is due to the deficiency of GABA in their brains. Additionally, Xanax addicts experience severe anxiety due to the same GABA deficiency. Like all other forms of addiction, Xanax addicts will experience a level of depression as well. At peak severity, Xanax withdrawal can result in seizures or death as is the case with alcohol withdrawal.

List of Xanax Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Severe insomnia
  • Tremors and shaking throughout body
  • Muscle pain
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea and/or vomiting
  • Difficulty thinking
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts and behaviors
  • Sweating
  • Aggression
  • Panic attacks

Can you detox from Xanax at home?

When a person is addicted to a benzodiazepine such as Xanax, he or she will typically be discouraged from attempting a Xanax detox on his or her own from the individual’s own home. There are many reasons why at-home Xanax or benzodiazepine detox is so highly discouraged, but the simplest reason is because benzodiazepine addiction is so potentially dangerous that medical professionals cannot advise addicts to attempt detoxification on their own since they will not be monitored by professionals to ensure their safety throughout the process. Since benzodiazepine withdrawal—like alcohol withdrawal—can potentially be fatal, people addicted to Xanax are strongly encouraged to seek Xanax detox treatment at an actual detoxification center where they can detox under the experienced and watchful eyes of professionals.

To better understand the dangers of an at-home Xanax detox, imagine this situation: A person who has been severely addicted to Xanax for several years suddenly ceases his or her use of Xanax; shortly thereafter, the individual begins to experience physical withdrawal symptoms that steadily increase in intensity. By approximately 36 hours after the last dose of Xanax when the withdrawal symptoms are at their peak, the individual begins to experience seizures due to withdrawal intensity; however, with no one present to supervise the individual, he or she does not survive.

Instead of allowing for even the remote possibility of a fatality, anyone addicted to Xanax should contact us so that we may help them to find Xanax detox treatments that work for their specific needs.

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How long does it take to detox from Xanax

Addiction is a very complex disease that can develop in many different ways and cause very different effects to different people. As such, it’s very difficult to predict the precise amount of time a person will require to detox from Xanax, or from any other substance for that matter. When a source offers a length of time by which a drug detoxification should take place and be completed, it’s almost always offered more as an approximation or average rather than an exact length of time. Some individuals who are in need of detox treatment may finish the detoxification process extremely quickly relative to others who have gone through the same treatments; meanwhile, others may require more time than most others to detox. Therefore, one should assume that any length of time given to indicate how long detox treatment will last is subject to change according to each patient’s specific bodily and the rate at which his or her body detoxes.

However, in the case of Xanax detoxification, the major withdrawal symptoms should subside between two and three weeks after the last dose of Xanax. Generally, it’s uncommon for a person addicted to Xanax to require more than four weeks of detoxification treatment, although it’s possible for a person to require half that much time or less.

  • Statistics show that Xanax is the 9th-best selling drug in the U.S.
  • Xanax becomes the 5th-best selling drug in the U.S. when you consider only prescription drugs.
  • Each year, more than 125,000 people visit emergency rooms across the U.S. for complications related to their use or abuse of Xanax.
  • Studies have found that 86 percent of people who seek assistance for Xanax actually used Xanax as a secondary drug.
  • Between the years 2004 and 2009, Xanax production increased by 148 percent, which is the second-highest growth behind oxycodone.
  • Of all the teens who abuse Xanax, almost half of them (49 percent) abuse the drug with at least one other substance such as alcohol or marijuana.
  • In the last five years, the annual number of prescriptions for Xanax in the U.S. has risen from 29.9 million to 37.5 million.