Detox Local

For the most immediate assistance

CALL

OR submit you number and someone will call you shortly!

If you are seeking drug and alcohol related addiction rehab for yourself or a loved one, the DetoxLocal.com hotline is a confidential and convenient solution.

Calls to any general hotline (non-facility) will be answered by Addiction Advisor's Treatment, American Addiction Centers, Delphi Health Group, Rise Behavioral Health and/or Elevations Health.

If you wish to contact a specific medical detox center then find a specific detox center using our detox locator tool or visit SAMHSA.gov.

To learn more about how Detox Local operates, please contact us

.

All submissions we receive will be followed up diligently and validated by a Detox Local staff member

Overview of Ecstasy detox

Also known as MDMA, Molly, or E, Ecstasy is a powerful psychoactive drug. Like Ketamine or GHB, Ecstasy is commonly referred to as a club drug because of the effects produced. It causes an extremely euphoric and psychedelic high. It gained popularity recreationally in the 1990s in clubs, but since has become popular at bars, music festivals, and house parties. It is also known as an aphrodisiac, causing some to have more frequent sexual encounters or be put in situations they would not normally put themselves in if if they were sober.

Ecstasy typically is sold as a tablet with a 'brand' marked on the pill, but is also sold in powder forms. It can be taken orally, nasally, or by injection. Ecstasy is one of the most commonly “cut” drugs, often containing other substances than MDMA, making it potentially more dangerous. Examples of other substances often found in ecstasy are ketamine, amphetamine, caffeine, ephedrine, methylone, methamphetamine, and flunitrazepam. “Cutting” ecstasy is sometimes used to increase the euphoric effects, but many times it is just utilized to save money. New synthetic drugs, commonly referred to as bath salts, are sold as MDMA or used to cut ecstasy to bring in more profit for the dealer. These designer drugs can be more dangerous and often very little research has been done on them.

MDMA was initially invented as a diet aide in Germany during the early 1900s. In the 1970s it gained popularity among the psychiatric community, and many claims were made that it had significant psychotherapeutic benefits. Because the drug causes a rush of serotonin in the brain, users feel much more relaxed and comfortable. They are more trusting and feel a closer bond to others around them. Doctors praised ecstasy for it's effects on trauma victims. Many of whom felt comfortable enough to talk about their trauma while influenced by the drug.

By 1985 the drug was banned by the FDA and DEA who listed it as a Schedule I substance. It was recognized for negative effects like extreme depression. Long term use was also psychologically addicting and caused permanent damage to neurotransmitters in the brain. The drug is not physically addicting, but many users describe an overwhelming craving for more.

How Detoxing From Ecstasy works

Drugs like opiates, benzos, and alcohol are the most commonly treated addictions in detox centers because of their popularity and the physical dependency they cause. Thus, one needs to be tapered off the drugs slowly to decrease the physical withdrawal symptoms. Because ecstasy is not physically addicting, a taper is not needed. Ecstasy detox allows an abuser to be safe and comfortable while coming off of the drug.

Detox is typically a 3-7 day period where the user is monitored by medical staff and often prescribed “comfort medications” to assist with sleep, depression, and anxiety. Although detoxing from a drug can be scary, a medical team works their hardest to make the detox process as comfortable as possible. Some centers have set schedules of meetings and therapy groups, while others allow patients more freedom by providing TVs, video game consoles, couches, bored games, and snacks. In detox, you will be assigned a room, either alone, or with someone else. Often you cannot bring in phones or computers, but they may be provided for you. Most detox centers treat all drug addictions, but some are substance specific, so it is important to know if a detox center will treat ecstasy abuse.

Medical staff often checks for blood imbalances, diseases, and one's overall health. Because many people have sex while on ecstasy, it is common for regular users to have a higher rate of STIs, which left untreated can become serious or spread to other people. Detox centers may also recommend a psychiatric evaluation. Many detox centers have therapy and invite in recovered addicts to share their experience with patients.

WHAT DOES THE Ecstasy DETOX PROCESS LOOK LIKE?

Although MDMA is not physically addicting, some users describe an inability to stop using the drug. MDMA is similar to stimulants like amphetamines, and can cause extreme depression and fatigue. Ecstasy keeps the body awake and many users find it very difficult to sleep or stay motivated the following days after ingesting the drug; making it difficult to stay sober on one's own accord. A medical detox facility will often prescribe “comfort” medication to alleviate these symptoms. Anti-anxiety medications such as benzodiazepines and antidepressants (Lexapro, Prozac, Wellbutrin) are the most common.

It is also much easier to stay clean in a lock-down medical environment than at one's own home in addition to it being safer. Because it is hard to know what substance may be in a particular batch of ecstasy, there may be more than one substance the user is addicted to. Some ecstasy tablets do contain physically addicting compounds, making medical detox even more important.

All medical detox centers have a highly trained staff and medical professionals on site 24/7 to monitor their patients and insure they are having a smooth and safe detox. Medical detox allows for a proper start to one's recovery and helps clear the brain, allowing for a more effective treatment process. There will also be other people detoxing as well, and can often relate to one another's experiences and support each other in their road to recovery.

While some substances cause a very dangerous physical withdrawal, ecstasy typically is a lesser dangerous drug to detox from. Although there are very small chances of seizures or cardiac arrest compared to substances like alcohol, ecstasy withdraw can be mentally unbearable. Because of the severe depression often associated with ecstasy withdrawal, detox may put the user at risk of harming themselves or others, requiring immediate medical attention.

Ecstasy causes the pleasure chemicals in the brain to be drained. After long term use, one may have a severe lack of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. These chemicals are essential for feelings of reward and overall happiness, leaving the user very depressed, lethargic, and often nihilistic. The lack of pleasure chemicals in the brain can leave one very unmotivated and unable to see the benefit of staying sober, this is why medical detox can be so beneficial for MDMA.

Ecstasy Detox Withdrawals

Pill Bottle Icon
Pill Icon
Syringe Icon

While some substances cause a very dangerous physical withdrawal, ecstasy typically is a lesser dangerous drug to detox from. Although there are very small chances of seizures or cardiac arrest compared to substances like alcohol, ecstasy withdraw can be mentally unbearable. Because of the severe depression often associated with ecstasy withdrawal, detox may put the user at risk of harming themselves or others, requiring immediate medical attention.

Ecstasy causes the pleasure chemicals in the brain to be drained. After long term use, one may have a severe lack of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. These chemicals are essential for feelings of reward and overall happiness, leaving the user very depressed, lethargic, and often nihilistic. The lack of pleasure chemicals in the brain can leave one very unmotivated and unable to see the benefit of staying sober, this is why medical detox can be so beneficial for MDMA.

List of Ecstasy Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Depression
  • Confusion
  • Anxiety
  • Cravings
  • Agitation
  • Paranoia
  • Insomnia
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Loss of appetite
  • Memory problems

Can you detox from Ecstasy at home?

Even though detoxing from ecstasy is not considered dangerous like alcohol and benzodiazepines it is still very hard for one to stay sober on their own. In theory one could detox from home, but it is not recommended as the accompanying symptoms of depression, anxiety and insomnia often inhibits the ability to stay sober. Users can feel suicidal or very angry during the detox process, making medical help highly advised. It is never recommended that one attempt to detox from any drug on their own.

Many users avoid recovery because of the fear associated with detox, but this is often because they withdrawal at their own home and do not know what medical detox is like. At home one feels the full effect of withdrawals and often feels hopeless, lonely, and depressed. At a detox facility there are people who can relate to them, doctors to insure comfort and safety, and medication to ease the feelings associated with withdrawal. MDMA is also considered to be an aphrodisiac, causing users to sometimes have promiscuous sex. At home one cannot have tests for blood borne diseases or STIs they could have contracted while using ecstasy.

Need help finding a detox center

How long does it take to detox from Ecstasy

The length of detox and withdrawal symptoms have many factors. The age, metabolism, weight, length of drug use, and amount of the drug used all play a part in the length of detox. An in-patient detox center often lasts 3-10 days depending on the individual. Typically the first 3 days after quitting MDMA will be the most severe, including symptoms of insomnia, anxiety, restlessness, agitation, paranoia, and cravings. After the initial 3 days, symptoms will begin to dissipate, but depression and lack of concentration may persist. After about a week the initial detox will be over, the drug will no longer be in the body, and one may begin to feel noticeably better.

Depending on how much of the drug had been used, one may have more long lasting effects on chemicals in the brain, and it may take weeks to months to begin to overcome depression and lack of concentration. Cravings may come time to time, but typically the longer one does not use the drug the less they will feel compelled to do so. After a month, normal sleep patterns should return and one should begin to feel more motivated. If depression is too great, or persists too long, doctors may prescribe antidepressants, for this would be the longest lasting symptom, due to ecstasy's effect on the reward system in the brain.

  • In 2013, over 17 million Americans reported having ever used ecstasy according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health
  • The 2013 NSDUH also showed that the rate of MDMA use is highest among 18-25 year olds, with 12.8% reporting having ever tried it
  • In 2010, numerous large-scale ecstasy labs were shut down. In Australia, there were seventeen labs shut down. In Canada, there were thirteen labs shut down. In Indonesia, there were twelve labs shut down. Finally, there was one lab shut down in Malaysia
  • The street price of ecstasy ranges from five to twenty dollars per pill
  • Experiments show that animals self-administer ecstasy. However, they self-administer ecstasy less frequently than cocaine or opiates