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Overview of Bath salts detox

If you keep up with current events, you’ve surely heard of a dangerous new craze involving a drug called bath salts. One of a new wave of chemical intoxicants known as designer drugs, bath salts typically come in the form of white, crystalline granules that make the substance appear much like the Epsom bath salts you can purchase in stores. In fact, the resemblance allows those who create this toxic to sell it legally in stores under the guise of being actual Epsom bath salts with packaging that states “Not for human consumption” to circumvent prohibition laws; however, these are two distinctly different substances that should not be confused and substance abusers know that imbibing these so-called bath salts results in a number of unpleasant effects. When they’re not labeled as Epsom bath salts, they’re frequently labeled as plant food or phone screen cleaner.

As far as the specific substance or substances that comprise bath salts, there’s some level of variability. Combining a number of chemicals in different ways produces several substances that are somewhat different while still offering many of the effects that one would associate with bath salts. The substances that are used to create bath salts are in a chemical family known as cathinones, which are comparable in their effects to certain amphetamines. Two of the specific cathinones often found in bath salts are mephedrone and methylone, but there are numerous others as well.

Over the past several years, there have been a number of reports in the news and media about people using bath salts and the strange or even alarming behaviors they exhibited while on the drug. A very common effect is for the user to seem extremely “out of it” in a manner that’s similar to — and yet different from — intoxication from alcohol. But the most notable of these incidents is when the use of bath salts triggers violent outbursts, resulting in serious injury or even death to others. For instance, there was allegedly a man in Florida who, after using bath salts, attacked another man and proceeded to literally eat his face off.

The recent spike in popularity of bath salts is due to the desire that substance abusers have to find ways to obtain “legal” highs; not only does this make the drug easier to obtain, but it protects them from getting into trouble like often happens when substance abusers are buying illicit drugs on the street. Unfortunately, this has also contributed to the alarmingly increasing rate of bath salts use. For this reason, we turn to one of the most important forms of tre

Click below for detailed Synthetic Drug detox guides

How Detoxing From Bath salts works

Many of the substances that are most familiar to us are either pharmaceutical drugs or illicit street drugs. Alcohol is another substance of abuse, but it’s one that is legal to purchase and consume as long as the user is of appropriate drinking age. However, there are a number of substances being sold to users legally and in plain sight, affording easy access to substances that are extremely prone to abuse and unpredictably dangerous. For instance, “huffing” is the act of inhaling certain gaseous substance such as compressed air or cracking open nitrous oxide cartridges in order to inhale the fumes contained within. Spice is another substance sold and purchased legally; the reason these mind-altering substances are legally available is because they’re not actually marketed for human consumption. The companies that produce and distribute these substances print warning labels that expressly forbid users from consuming the substances, making it legal for them to continue selling their products while users know that they’re able to recreationally abuse these substances in spite of the warning.

In addition to nitrous cartridges and synthetic marijuana, bath salts are another commercially available product that’s proven to be prone to abuse and extremely dangerous. Similar to spice, bath salts are a chemical product, which means that they contain one of a number of different chemicals that are similar in structure and in their effects to cathinones. Cathinones are an amphetamine-like stimulant that’s derived from the khat plant, accounting for the stimulant effects of bath salts. In fact, cathinone-like chemicals have proven to be similar not only to methamphetamines, but also to MDMA, or the active ingredient in the club drug widely known as ecstasy.

Typically, bath salts are available in a white or brown crystalline form, sold in stores in small baggie-like or foil packages that are often labeled as plant food, jewelry cleaner, or smartphone screen cleaner. On the packaging, you’ll typically see the warning “Not For Human Consumption”, which allows the companies that make bath salts to continue selling them. After all, people buy a variety of products with similar warnings, so the companies producing bath salts cannot legally be held liable for the widespread abuse of bath salts because of the printed warnings that savvy users know to ignore. However, it’s important that people realize bath salts and Epsom salts are not the same thing. There’s been much confusion regarding the difference between Epsom and bath salts with many curious substance abusers assuming they can buy Epsom salts to obtain the product, but Epsom salts are indeed designed for use during bathing and have no ingredients that could offer intoxication of any sort.

Although there are few cases in which bath salts can be definitively attributed to user deaths, the use of bath salts for recreational intoxication is notoriously dangerous, resulting in a number of very well-known news reports of users become extremely violent. It’s known that one of the many potential effects of bath salts use is temporary psychosis; after imbibing the bath salts, there have been a number of users who suddenly became quite violent, attacking others or causing direct harm to themselves. Therefore, we will take a moment to explain about the specific effects of bath salts, whether or not they are addictive, and how to complete a bath salts detox.

WHAT DOES THE Bath salts DETOX PROCESS LOOK LIKE?

As with any substance, the continued use of bath salts will build the drug up in the individual’s system. Additionally, the habitual use of a substance will result in the body becoming increasingly tolerant and, eventually, even dependent on the substance, particularly with regard to the brain and its neurochemistry. Being similar to methamphetamines, bath salts are a stimulant that often cause psychosis, so much of the drug’s effects are in the brain and manifest bizarre behaviors.

The purpose of a detox, whether from bath salts or any other drug, is to allow a person to become capable of progressing into subsequent stages of addiction — particular into phases involving active addiction treatment — without experiencing the pain or discomfort of withdrawal symptoms. Therefore, a bath salts detox is intended to rid the body of any of the bath salts in an addict’s system and will be much like a crystal methamphetamine detoxification. As such, a bath salts detox consists of a number of treatments and techniques that are designed to make this process as smooth as possible.

It was back in 2011 when bath salts emerged as the next major drug trend and at the time we knew very little about them besides the bizarre behaviors that bath salts users exhibited. Each year, there seem to be a number of incidents that remain a topic of discussion, controversy, and concern. Since bath salts first emerged as a major nationwide issue, we’ve found a number of effects that result from bath salts use.

According to the studies conducted on bath salts as a drug of abuse, most of the effects of bath salts intoxication are distilled into a three- to four-hour period. During this time, a user exhibits many of the symptoms one would expect of a powerful stimulant, including rapid heartbeat, elevated blood pressure, perspiration, and heavy respiration. Users of bath salts often experience panic attacks and suffer from the same severe insomnia as users of crystal methamphetamine. Beyond the initial intoxication, users of bath salts often experience headaches, depression, lasting insomnia, liver and kidney damage, loss of bowel control, and a number of other serious effects.

Bath salts Detox Withdrawals

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It was back in 2011 when bath salts emerged as the next major drug trend and at the time we knew very little about them besides the bizarre behaviors that bath salts users exhibited. Each year, there seem to be a number of incidents that remain a topic of discussion, controversy, and concern. Since bath salts first emerged as a major nationwide issue, we’ve found a number of effects that result from bath salts use.

According to the studies conducted on bath salts as a drug of abuse, most of the effects of bath salts intoxication are distilled into a three- to four-hour period. During this time, a user exhibits many of the symptoms one would expect of a powerful stimulant, including rapid heartbeat, elevated blood pressure, perspiration, and heavy respiration. Users of bath salts often experience panic attacks and suffer from the same severe insomnia as users of crystal methamphetamine. Beyond the initial intoxication, users of bath salts often experience headaches, depression, lasting insomnia, liver and kidney damage, loss of bowel control, and a number of other serious effects.

List of Bath salts Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Strong cravings for the drug
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Agitation
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Congestion of sinuses
  • Fatigue
  • Lack of motivation
  • Poor quality of sleep
  • Decrease in memory
  • Unpredictable outbursts of aggressio

Can you detox from Bath salts at home?

While it’s possible to detox on one’s own at home, it’s strongly disadvised for a couple key reasons. First, there are a number of potential risks and distractions at home that could compromise a person’s ability to complete a detox. Additionally, detoxing at home means having no medical supervision to ensure one’s safety. Finally, a person detoxing from home isn’t receiving any of the care that he or she would receive while in an actual bath salts detox program; therefore, a person is not only safer by detoxing in an actual detox program, but it’s a more comfortable and successful experience as well.

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How long does it take to detox from Bath salts

Everyone’s needs are different. Some people heal relatively quickly while others require a bit more time. When it comes to a bath salts detox — which, again, is quite similar to a methamphetamine detox — most people will be able to completely detox from bath salts within two to five days. For users who have used bath salts particularly frequently, it’s possible to need up to ten days, although it’s very uncommon for a person to need that much time.

  • Bath salts are widely assumed to be a single drug; however, the name “bath salts” actually refers to an entire family of chemical stimulants that are quite similar in their molecular structures and in their effects to amphetamines.
  • Cathinone are extracted from the khat plant using the same procedure with which cocaine is extracted from the coca plant.
  • Addiction to cathinones is a relatively new problem in the U.S., but is more notorious in other countries such as Australia, Europe, and the Middle East where people have been becoming addicted to cathinones since at least the early 2000s.