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Overview of Tramadol detox

When we think about the disease of addiction, the substances that most often come to mind are ones like alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, and other illicit street drugs. These days there are also a number of synthetic drugs — spice, bath salts, methamphetamine — that pose a major threat to our society. But one of the most problematic classes of drugs is one that you would assume would be more help than harm: pharmaceuticals. The abuse of prescription drugs— Tramadol, Xanax, Vicodin, Valium, Percocet, and many others — became extremely prevalent in the mid-1990s with the release of OxyContin, which triggered a major prescription drug epidemic that affects us to this day. However, the present discussion isn’t about OxyContin, but rather a prescription drug called Tramadol. and the importance Tramadol detox offers.

Compared to most other pharmaceutical drugs, Tramadol is rather young. In fact, it was only just created in 1962 by a German pharmaceutical company. Its initial purpose was to treat pain and was testing as a painkiller for fifteen years before it was released to international market in 1977. Upon its release, Tramadol was a huge success. However, it wasn’t first available in the United States until 1995, at which point it became quite popular in the U.S., too. By 2008, there were more than 23 million prescriptions written for Tramadol each year; by 2012, the number of annual prescriptions of Tramadol was approaching 40 million.

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How Detoxing From Tramadol works

Tramadol is quite unique compared to other pharmaceuticals, particularly when you compare the drug to other drugs used for painkillers. Although it’s considered an opiate due to the fact that it bonds with the opiate receptors in the brain, Tramadol also functions similar to antidepressant drugs; specifically, Tramadol can operate as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. It’s also not uncommon for Tramadol to be used in veterinary medicine, especially after surgical procedures.

In 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration moved Tramadol into the Schedule IV class of controlled substances. Since then, there’s been a major increase in public awareness as to the dangers of Tramadol and its abuse potential. There are other drugs that are considered more desirable by substance abusers due to the fact that their effects are more intense, but that doesn’t negate the fact that Tramadol is a very dangerous and highly addictive substance. Fortunately, there are a number of recovery resources available to those who have become addicted to Tramadol.

WHAT DOES THE Tramadol DETOX PROCESS LOOK LIKE?

Like other opiate drugs, Tramadol enters the body, makes its way to the brain, and bonds with the opiate receptors in the brain. It’s here that the drug creates its opiate-like effects, relieving any pain that a person might be experiencing. The continuous intake of Tramadol also throws off the chemical balance of the brain, particularly when it comes to serotonin and norepinephrine. But Tramadol also acts as a serotonin or norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor in a similar manner as an antidepressant, preventing a person’s brain from reabsorbing the feel-good chemicals that have spiked as a result of the drugs initial intake. Over time with the continuous abuse of Tramadol, the body becomes dependent on the drug, coming to rely on Tramadol even for natural functions.

Although addiction treatment programs are meant to help individuals overcome their addictions to Tramadol, the individual would experience withdrawal symptoms if he or she simply ceased intake of Tramadol and began addiction treatment. It would be quite difficult to concentrate on one’s treatments while experiencing withdrawal symptoms, which is where Tramadol detox comes in. The purpose of Tramadol detox treatment is, among other things, to cleanse the body, returning it to a state of wellness and health. A Tramadol addict will experience withdrawal symptoms if he or she attempts to cease intake of the drug while still dependent to it, so the other main reason for the individual to break his or her physical dependence on Tramadol; the idea is to be able to cease his or her consumption of the drug without experiencing withdrawal symptoms so that the individual can begin the treatment phase of addiction recovery.

The length of time required for a Tramadol detox can vary depending on a number of factors, but generally detoxification from Tramadol and most other opiates will take seven to ten days. Specifically, this is the amount of time that it takes for the body to flush itself of Tramadol as well as any other unnatural, potentially harmful toxins. During a period of detoxification, a person goes to a detox facility where he or she is provided with his or her own private accommodations and encouraged to relax to focus on his or her recovery. Additionally, the individual is provided with healthy, nutritious meals and is encouraged to hydrate. To pass the time, patients are provided with books and magazines, playing cards and games, radio to listen to music, and other forms of entertainment. This is intended to be a period of relaxation and healing; he or she won’t be expected to participate in actual treatments until the completion of the Tramadol detox.

As is the case with all other opiate or opioid drugs, addiction to Tramadol is known to result in Tramadol withdrawal symptoms in the event that the addict would cease intake of the substance. While there are certain types of withdrawal — such as alcoholic and benzodiazepine withdrawal — that are known to potentially be life-threatening, Tramadol withdrawal symptoms won’t reach such a severity as to put a person in danger or risk his or her safety. Opiate withdrawals are notoriously unpleasant, which is a major contributor to why so many painkiller addicts are reluctant to seek treatment, but any Tramadol addict can detox from Tramadol safely.

Although it’s not dangerous, there are a number of symptoms associated with Tramadol withdrawal that make the experience so unpleasant. Like other types of opiate painkillers, Tramadol withdrawal symptoms progress through a series of stages. Over the course of the first twenty-four hours, the withdrawal symptoms begin to manifest, including such things as sweating, irritability, anxiousness, cravings, and a sense of dysphoria, which is the term used to describe an overall sense of physiological unpleasantness and unwellness.

After the first twenty-four hours and up to seventy-two hours, Tramadol withdrawal symptoms reach their apex. At this point, the Tramadol addict is experiencing profuse sweating, nausea, intestinal cramping, intermittent hot flashes and cold chills, goosebumps, more profound dysphoria, depression, intense anxiety, restlessness, physical discomfort or pain in the muscles and joints, diarrhea, headaches, difficulty forming coherent thoughts, and overwhelming cravings for the drug. Beyond seventy-two hours, the symptoms of Tramadol withdrawal begin to subside as the individual stabilizes during the final stage of the Tramadol detoxification process. The primary benefit of Tramadol detox treatment is that is ensures a person is no longer experiencing the physiological discomfort associated with early recovery by the time he or she begins participating in actual addiction treatments. In short, Tramadol detox helps to restore to addict’s body to a state of health and wellness, severing the individual’s physical dependence on Tramadol before he or she starts treatment.

Tramadol Detox Withdrawals

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As is the case with all other opiate or opioid drugs, addiction to Tramadol is known to result in Tramadol withdrawal symptoms in the event that the addict would cease intake of the substance. While there are certain types of withdrawal — such as alcoholic and benzodiazepine withdrawal — that are known to potentially be life-threatening, Tramadol withdrawal symptoms won’t reach such a severity as to put a person in danger or risk his or her safety. Opiate withdrawals are notoriously unpleasant, which is a major contributor to why so many painkiller addicts are reluctant to seek treatment, but any Tramadol addict can detox from Tramadol safely.

Although it’s not dangerous, there are a number of symptoms associated with Tramadol withdrawal that make the experience so unpleasant. Like other types of opiate painkillers, Tramadol withdrawal symptoms progress through a series of stages. Over the course of the first twenty-four hours, the withdrawal symptoms begin to manifest, including such things as sweating, irritability, anxiousness, cravings, and a sense of dysphoria, which is the term used to describe an overall sense of physiological unpleasantness and unwellness.

After the first twenty-four hours and up to seventy-two hours, Tramadol withdrawal symptoms reach their apex. At this point, the Tramadol addict is experiencing profuse sweating, nausea, intestinal cramping, intermittent hot flashes and cold chills, goosebumps, more profound dysphoria, depression, intense anxiety, restlessness, physical discomfort or pain in the muscles and joints, diarrhea, headaches, difficulty forming coherent thoughts, and overwhelming cravings for the drug. Beyond seventy-two hours, the symptoms of Tramadol withdrawal begin to subside as the individual stabilizes during the final stage of the Tramadol detoxification process. The primary benefit of Tramadol detox treatment is that is ensures a person is no longer experiencing the physiological discomfort associated with early recovery by the time he or she begins participating in actual addiction treatments. In short, Tramadol detox helps to restore to addict’s body to a state of health and wellness, severing the individual’s physical dependence on Tramadol before he or she starts treatment.

List of Tramadol Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Irritability
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Intestinal cramping
  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea
  • Difficulty thinking/concentrating
  • Intense cravings
  • Dysphoria
  • Insomnia
  • Yawning
  • Sneezing
  • Increase in body temperature
  • Increase in heart rate
  • Headaches
  • Loss of appetite
  • Increase in blood pressure

Can you detox from Tramadol at home?

Although there are forms of outpatient detox available, individuals seeking detoxification treatment are discouraged from attempting an outpatient detox for a couple key reasons. For one thing, outpatient detox doesn’t provide the same level of care and treatment as an inpatient medical detox, which means that patients will be forced to endure withdrawal symptoms at their full intensity, making them less likely to complete the detox without reverting back to substance abuse. Additionally, the round-the-clock medical supervision offered as part of inpatient detox programs ensures each patient’s safety and comfort throughout the entire detox process.

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How long does it take to detox from Tramadol

There are many different factors that can affect the length of time required for an individual to complete a detox treatment program. Some of the most important factors include: the length of time spent in active Tramadol addiction, the severity of the individual’s habit, whether he or she was a poly-drug addict, whether there have been previous attempts at recovery, the individual’s body type and size, and family history. Generally, a person undergoing a Tramadol detox should be able to complete the detoxification treatment in two weeks or less with the average person completing a Tramadol detox in roughly ten days.

  • In 2013, surveys found that more than seven million Americans over the age of 12 were using Tramadol for recreational enjoyment.
  • The same 2013 surveys also found that nearly 3 percent of all Americans between the ages of 18 and 25 were using Tramadol for non-medical purposes.
  • A study by SAMHSA found that emergency room visits that occurred due to adverse reactions to or overdoses of Tramadol almost tripled in just a six-year period.
  • According to a 2005 study, approximately 84 percent of individuals who abuse Tramadol for recreational purposes have a seizure within 24 hours.